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Constitutional Law: Introduction to Civil Rights: Justice Project

Sources for Research

Selected Internet Sources

Biographies and Memoirs

The Tie Goes to Freedom

At the ideological center of the Supreme Court sits Anthony M. Kennedy, whose pivotal role on the Rehnquist Court is only expected to grow in importance now that he is the lone "swing Justice" on the Roberts Court. The Ties Goes to Freedom is the first book-length analysis of Kennedy, and it challenges the conventional wisdom that his jurisprudence is inconsistent and incoherent.

My Own Words

The first book from Ruth Bader Ginsburg since becoming a Supreme Court Justice in 1993--a witty, engaging, serious, and playful collection of writings and speeches from the woman who has had a powerful and enduring influence on law, women's rights, and popular culture.

The Man Who Once Was Whizzer White

Profiles the college football star who became the highest paid rookie in professional football, a World War II hero, and one of the Supreme Court's longest-serving justices.

The Majesty of the Law

InThe Majesty of the Law, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor explores the law, her life as a Justice, and how the Court has evolved and continues to function, grow, and change as an American institution. Tracing some of the origins of American law through history, people, and ideas, O’Connor sheds new light on the basics, and through personal observation she explores the development of institutions and ideas we have come to regard as fundamental. O’Connor discusses notable cases that have shaped American democracy and the Court as we know it today, and she traces the turbulent battle women have fought for a place in our nation’s legal system since America’s inception.

Justice Brennan

A sweeping insider look at the life of William Brennan, champion of free speech and widely considered the most influential Supreme Court justice of the twentieth century   Before his death, William Brennan granted Stephen Wermiel access to volumes of personal and court materials that are sealed to the public until 2017. These are what Jeffrey Toobin has called "a coveted set of documents" that includes Brennan's case histories--in which he recorded strategies behind all the major battles of the past half century, includingRoe v. Wade, affirmative action, the death penalty, obscenity law, and the constitutional right to privacy--as well as more personal documents that reveal some of Brennan's curious contradictions, like his refusal to hire female clerks even as he wrote groundbreaking women's rights decisions; his complex stance as a justice and a Catholic; and details on Brennan's unprecedented working relationship with Chief Justice Earl Warren.

Scalia Speaks

This definitive collection of beloved Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's finest speeches covers topics as varied as the law, faith, virtue, pastimes, and his heroes and friends. Featuring a foreword by longtime friend Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and an intimate introduction by his youngest son, this volume includes dozens of speeches, some deeply personal, that have never before been published.

Justice Lewis F. Powell, Jr.

Justice Lewis F. Powell, Jr. is an absorbing and readable biography of one of the most important Supreme Court Justices since World War II.

History Department Research Guide

Follow these guidelines for all of your History Department research papers.

Project Assignment and Guidelines

Find a Book in the Library

Use the catalog to search for books in our library by any keyword: subject, title, or author.  Please ask us if you can't find what you're looking for, or if you need help finding the books on our shelves.

Accessing the New York Times

As a Kent School student or employee, you are eligible for a free digital subscription to The New York Times, which includes access to their full archives back to 1851.  To start your account please follow these steps:

1. From any computer on campus, navigate to nytimes.com/passes

2. Follow their steps to create a free account using your Kent School e-mail and ANY password (it should not be your network password).

3. Check your Kent School e-mail account for a verification e-mail message, and click the link inside it to activate your account. Once your account is activated, you will have digital access on all devices with this logon.  You can download mobile apps by visiting nytimes.com/mobile if you wish.

4. Go to The New York Times online and log in with your Kent School account.